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Help Us Donate to the Mars Generation!

 
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Last year, we did our best to help donate to the Mars Generation and to help them reach their goal of $20,000!  We were able to help them, and we raised almost $150 for them. 

 

This year, we want to raise 8x that.

 

 
 

The Mars Generation is a non-profit that helps kids get excited about STEM.  Started by Abigail Harrison, or as many know her, Astronaut Abby, in 2015, The Mars Generation has been helping children get into Science, Tech, Engineering, and Math ever since.  

 

This year, it's their 3rd Annual #TrainLikeaMartian challenge.  The challenge 'is a week of fun activities that brings awareness to the importance of science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM) education, space exploration, and physical fitness to students and adults around the world' according to their website.

 

Last year, FemSTEM got involved, and we want to get involved again.

 

We did some of the challenges ourselves, as well as started a fundraising page to help raise them up to their goal!

 

Here is our current fundraising page to help them out this year!

 

If you donate, all of the money goes directly to the Mars Generation -- we don't see any of it.  This is not sponsored by them in any way, shape or form, it's just a fun way to help our fellow STEM-lovers help others!

 

And -- if you donate $25 or more, you get entered into their daily prize drawings as well as their grand prize drawings.  You can learn more information about their prizes here.  On top of that, you'll get a handwritten thank you card from us no matter how much you donate (as long as you donate through our fundraiser here).  

 

What are you waiting for!!

 

DONATE NOW

 
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Mariah Loeber is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of FemSTEM.com. She studies English and is a huge fan of all things STEM.  Find her on Twitter.



INTERVIEW: Cui Wang Ph.D: Microbiology Science Team For MARS

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A few weeks ago, MARS INC. contacted me, asking me to interview four of their Women in STEM.*  Over the next few weeks, their interviews will be posting one by one.

This interview is with Cui Wang, who works in the Global Food Safety Center for MARS in Beijing.

 


 

Q:  Hello, Cui!  Thank you so much for sitting down to answer some of these questions.  I know that our readers are going to find your job in STEM fascinating!  Food safety isn’t always something we talk about until there’s a dangerous bacterial breakout of some kind due to something wrong with our food.

So, to go along with that, my first question is: what sparked your interest in the science of food safety?

 

A:  In line with my original plan to pursue a career in the pharmaceutical industry, I started out conducting research to support the production of vaccines from fermentation at the beginning of graduate school. However, my interests changed after several serious food safety incidents were reported just after I had my first baby.  

 

I suddenly realized the importance and value of food safety and decided to adjust my career path to help ensure and secure the safety of safe and healthy food. I really hope that I can leverage my expertise to help reduce the risk of food safety issues in the future and this is what I’m working on  together with my fellow Associates at the Mars Global Food Safety Center.

 

I love food and I’m passionate about this space, which definitely helps! Conducting this meaningful work is my passion so I am constantly encouraged to go further.

 

Q:  What steps were taken in order for you to reach your PhD in Applied and Environmental Microbiology?

 

A: I took the opportunity to be a research assistant supporting projects in two national key labs while I was in university and this is where I discovered my interest in Applied and Environmental Biology (AEM) research. I began preparing applications for PhD programs in AEM, which meant taking the TOEFL, GRE tests and going through the interview process, etc. After successfully obtaining a place at Georgia State University, I spent the first two years attending training courses to learn new microbiological lab skills, and designing and writing the proposal for my PhD project based on my committees’ instructions and my interests.

 

At the same time, I was a teaching assistant supporting biology and microbiology courses for major and non-major college students. After passing the necessary exams, I became a senior PhD student and started my proposed project and also took part in other related projects. I trained several Masters and junior PhD students to become team members so that they could support different research projects in areas such as scale-up fermentation, molecular biology, protein purification, anti-fungal research and fruit ripening research. As part of this, I also communicated and collaborated with other senior PhD students, professors, and experts during seminars and conferences, and even through daily work. This helped to accelerate my development through brainstorming projects combined with coaching and mentoring. Of course, conducting experiments and spending a great deal of time in the lab were essential in demonstrating the hypothesis of my proposal. With solid data from these experiments, I passed my dissertation and finally received my PhD.

 

Q:  Can you briefly explain what a day at your job as a microbiology research scientist is like?

 

A:  At the Mars Global Food Safety Center, I conduct scientific research to generate insights and explore solutions for some of the biggest food safety challenges facing the industry today. For example, I am leading several research projects focused on controlling aflatoxins, one of the most potent, naturally occurring liver carcinogens that we know of today.

 

On our planet, 4.5 billion people consume food that contains aflatoxins every day. One of my projects aims to understand the correlation between the reuse of jute bags for ingredient storage (for example maize) and mycotoxin risk. 

 

I also aim to provide practical advice that could be easily adopted by farmers to help them reduce the risk of aflatoxin contamination. To accomplish projects such as this, it is necessary to keep close communication with our global partners, whilst also being able to deliver our work in the lab. During the working day, I design technical plans to achieve the objectives of my projects, train the lab assistants and conduct experiments with them, analyze data, conduct trouble shooting and review the progress of projects. I also communicate food safety information with internal and external resources, and support other team members as a consultant.

 

 

Q:  Something I found interesting about your position is that I was told that it was non-competitive.  So, the information that you discover and research is shared across the world with different partners, so that we can all have access to this information on how to keep our food safer.  That’s a kind of science communication!  Do you find that this non-competitive atmosphere makes your position more enjoyable, and more engaging?  And do you ever learn anything from the partners you work with?

 

A: At the Mars Global Food Safety Center, being non-competitive means that we aim to share and communicate the results of our work in the public domain to help raise the bar for all. This creates a very positive environment for the food industry and the food supply chain, as well as for scientists to conduct their research. We believe that food safety is a basic human right, and we actively seek to work collaboratively with other entities to ensure safer food for all.

 

As a research scientist, in such an atmosphere, I have more space and resources to think, discover, and solve real problems and challenges in food safety. I can communicate and collaborate with other scientists or experts even from other companies or institutions, which makes my work more effective and engaging. In return, I experience great support and encouragement from my partners, and I believe that together we really can help provide more people with access to safe food.

 

Q:  I was told that you were also involved in other forms of science communication.  You work with the ‘China Children and Teenager’s Fund’, and help these kids learn more about food safety.  What does this job entail?  Do you find that your work in this position is fruitful in your area?  Why or why not?

 

A: As a mother of two young boys, I firmly believe that food safety education needs to start from an early age. This could provide life-long benefits to the next generation. I’m very glad that I was able to take part in this mission by providing consultation and expertise to the ‘China National Children’s Food Safety Guard Campaign’, organized by China Nutrition and Health Food Association (CHNFA) and China Children and Teenager Foundation (CCTF). The Mars Global Food Safety Center is a key sponsor and initiator of this collaboration. Through the project, we designed interactive learning toolkits, video and painting books with food safety information for the children. The materials have been rolled out to more than 8 provinces in China, covering tens of thousands of kids, which makes me feel very proud. 

 

Q:  What would you say the biggest challenge in your field is?  Anything in particular?

 

A:  Some of the biggest challenges in food safety come from the global nature of the food supply chain, which today creates many common touch points among industry, regulators, customers, and consumers. More than ever before, food and food ingredients are being shipped around the world.  A food safety issue or risk from one raw material, one company, or one region, can now quickly expand to be a global problem. For example, my research projects related to mycotoxin caused by the fungal contamination of grains such as corn, wheat, and rice, is a big concern for the supply chain globally. That’s why we are trying to work with our global partners in a more collaborative way than ever before. 

 

Q:  Do you have any advice for those looking into pursuing your field of STEM?

 

A:   Follow your real passion and get to know what your true area of interest is. Try to find a mentor or coach throughout your career and use him or her as a role model that can inspire and encourage you to be the best version of yourself.  And in your work life seek out sponsors, people that will look out for you, help plan your career path and work with you to help you realize your full potential. Lastly, do not forget to take a moment to enjoy your life and spend time with your family. 

 

  

*This post was not sponsored by Mars Inc.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Mariah Loeber is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of FemSTEM.com. She studies English and is a huge fan of all things STEM.  Find her on Twitter.



INTERVIEW: Valerie Maldonado Senior Engineer Process Developer for MARS

 
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A few weeks ago, MARS INC. contacted me, asking me to interview four of their Women in STEM.*  Over the next few weeks, their interviews will be posting one by one.

This interview is with Valerie Maldonado, Fruity Confections CBU Mars Wrigley Confectionery here in the US.

 


 

Q: Valerie, first of all, I’d like to thank you for taking the time to answer some questions I had for you regarding your STEM job at MARS.


My first question, since your job focuses on the development of new candy, such as Starburst, I have to ask: What does candy have to do with STEM?

 

A: Making chocolate, candy, gum and mints is no different than cooking. Our role in Research & Development (R&D) is to ensure that we deliver high-quality products to millions of consumers all over the world. We have to apply science and engineering to guarantee that every product someone buys and tastes has the same great quality.

 

Q: What was it that first got you interested in STEM? And when did you know you wanted to pursue a career in STEM?

 

A: When I was in the third grade, we had the opportunity to visit a gum and candy factory in my hometown of Caracas, Venezuela as part of a school trip. I was so excited about the opportunity that I made my mom volunteer as a chaperone so that she could come with me too. I still remember the smell of bubblegum when we drove near the factory. That’s when I started becoming interested in how candies are made. My curiosity, along with an interest in math and chemistry, inspired me to pursue my degree in Chemical Engineering.

 
 

 

Q: What steps did you have to take in order to reach your goals in STEM?

 

A: During my undergraduate program in college, I had to work hard to get
through some of my classes as engineering coursework can be quite demanding. Many people are intimidated by the STEM fields because they believe you have to be extremely smart to get through school. Trust me, you will meet very smart people who are scientists and engineers, but the reality is that for the rest of us it takes more discipline and hard work than anything else.


Once I started my career, I was usually the only woman engineer in my teams. I had to learn to be confident and to stand up for what I believe in. Being the only woman in the room can be very intimidating, especially when you first start out in the field – not only are you the only woman, but you’re usually the youngest person. Learning to be persistent has been the key for me in driving my career forward.

 

Q: What exactly does being an “engineering consultant” mean? And in your current position as a “Senior Engineer Process Developer”, can you summarize what you do on a day-to- day basis?

 

A: When I was an engineer consultant, I worked with a team of engineers from all fields (electrical, civil, mechanical and chemical) and construction managers to execute projects at different factories. I had the opportunity to work in a wide variety of industries as the company operated in many fields: my first project was an oil spill cleanup and from there I worked on projects in soap, ice cream and engine oil manufacturing. It was a great place to learn and use the technical skills I had gained from my engineering education.

In my current role as Senior Engineer, Process Development, I’m either in the office, factories, or our pilot plant in Chicago. While I am in the office, I am typically collaborating with different team members working on our future innovations. I have projects that are four years out, but I’m also working on initiatives that are currently getting close to launch.


I travel to our factories across the globe to test new processes and formulas as we work through product and process development. I enjoy going to our factories and working with our teams at the sites to bring the formulations we have tested at a small scale in our Chicago pilot plant to life at scale.

 

Q: What kind of technology and equipment goes into candy making?

 

A: There is a lot of technology that goes into making our products in a consistent manner for millions of consumers all over the world. For making fruity products such as Starburst and Skittles, technology helps us make the toffee base, remove moisture and shape the products into their final form. I have always been impressed by the packaging machines we use for wrapping gum, which can wrap thousands of pieces of gum in one minute and move at such highly efficient speed.

 

Q: When I was told about you, I was told that you’re “an advocate for
emphasizing that you don’t have to be a ‘certain way’ to work in a STEM field”. Can you elaborate on what you mean by that?

 

A: There are stereotypes that are attached to the people who pursue careers in the STEM field. Being interested in science hasn’t always been the “cool” thing to do. My sophomore year of college, I met a friend in one of my chemical engineering core classes who later told me he thought I was lost when I entered the classroom the first day. He had firm reasons to think so: women were the minority in engineering classrooms at that time and I am Latina. Throughout my career I’ve been asked if I’m in marketing or sales and people are usually surprised when I say I am an engineer. I strongly believe that regardless of the field you go into, you can be yourself and we should all embrace what is unique about us regardless of stereotypes.

 

Q: If you were to give advice to someone who wanted to work in this field, or a similar one, what would you tell them?

 

A: Studying STEM provides you with a very solid foundation for the rest of your life. I have many friends that have studied engineering who now work in other fields such as sales, marketing, supply chain, etc. and are thankful that
engineering prepared them with the problem solving and analytical skills that
allows them to excel in their careers. STEM fields set you up with a great deal of job possibilities—options that enable you to lead a great life with financial
independence.

  

*This post was not sponsored by Mars Inc.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Mariah Loeber is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of FemSTEM.com. She studies English and is a huge fan of all things STEM.  Find her on Twitter.



STEM GEMS: A Review of a Book about Women in STEM

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    When kids think of the modern scientist — who do they think of?  Usually, Bill Nye the Science Guy will come to mind (and why not? His catchy theme song has infected the minds of all American kids since 1993).  That …may be it.  Some kids may know of Stephen Hawking, Neil Degrasse Tyson, or Michio Kaku.  

 

    The pattern?  All of these modern day scientists have one thing in common: they are all men.

 

    Stephanie Espy set out to change that.

 

 
 

    Stephanie Espy is a Chemical Engineer and author who decided to shine a light on 44 of today’s modern women scientists.  “I have always been passionate about STEM,”  She writes on her website about why she wrote the book to begin with.  “and I’m equally passionate about getting more girls and young women excited about STEM too. I wrote this book with a mission: to help girls and young women to see their future selves as scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians, and to show them the many diverse options that exist in STEM.”

 

    With this book, she reached her goal and did it spectacularly.

 

    Out of graciousness, I was sent a copy of this book.  Because my life was so hectic, it took me a while to actually get around to reading it, but when I did — I had a hard time putting it down when real life called me to get some work done.  

 

    My first thought was: “Why is this not in every school library?”  

 

 

    These short biographies of these women in STEM give a fun look to their lives, their positions, and their passions.  However, not only did Espy provide 44 role models in STEM from all sorts of walks of life — she does something else for the readers, too. Past all of the bios is advice that Espy has written specifically for the girls who pick up this book.  Advice towards who to get started in STEM, and how to keep up with your goals in these fields.  Taking the stories from the 44 gems, and creating practical guidance from them.

 

    This books is excellently written on top of it all.  It kept my attention, and it taught me about these women effectively.  It’s bound to keep the attention of children in class, and it really should be required reading, or at least suggested reading for science classes.  It would also be an excellent choice for a book report.  

 

    I keep mentioning children reading this, but really, it’s fantastic for all ages.  The writing doesn’t talk down to the reader in the least, and everyone can learn something from it.  My guess is that most people who pick up this book haven’t heard of all of these women — if they’ve heard of any of them to begin with.

 

    Consider supporting Stephanie Espy in her efforts buy purchasing her book here.  You won’t be sorry you did it.  

 

*Mariah was given a copy of this book to read and review for free. This post is otherwise non-sponosered.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Mariah Loeber is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of FemSTEM.com. She studies English and is a huge fan of all things STEM.  Find her on Twitter.



But What If She’s Just Not Interested in STEM?

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Every day there is more and more encouragement on the internet and other forms of media for girls to get into STEM fields and to thrive in them.  From shows on PBS, to Twitter threads and Facebook groups, and lots and lots of news stories about girls thriving in STEM in order to encourage other girls to get into STEM.

 

This …might be a cause of some anxiety for some parents depending on some things.

 

What if she’s just not interested in STEM? 

 

The fact is, we should all be interested in STEM to some degree.  Not only will some interest help us get through our schooling (if I had more of an interest in Math, it would have helped me a ton), but there’s something we need to face.  STEM is in our every day lives, whether we like it or not.  Without STEM there would be no computers, or smart phones, or televisions.  Without STEM there wouldn’t be the plants outside, or the pets within our houses!  We wouldn’t even have our homes, if you think about it!  Construction takes a lot of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math!

 

If we don’t have an interest in STEM at all, we don’t have an interest in a lot of life. Without you even realizing it, some of your interests (if not most of your interests) are going to be linked in STEM.  This is also true for your daughters (and sons, of course).

 

Another fact: Truthfully? Though we might not have a career in it, we all are scientists.

 

Something to consider might be: is she not interested in STEM, or has she just not been exposed to it enough?

 

There’s lots of ways to expose your girls to STEM that make it fun and enjoyable for them.  More and more books about STEM are coming out for younger ages, and more and more programs exist to get girls into STEM.

 

[caption id="attachment_465" align="aligncenter" width="700"]<a href="http://www.surlatoile.com/WomenInScience/"><img class="wp-image-465" src="https://femstem.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_2912-1024x685.jpg" alt="women in science" width="700" height="469" /></a> From luanagames.com[/caption]

 

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Here are a few for your viewing pleasure*:

 

#GirlsWhoCode - A national non-profit organization dedicated to closing the gender gap in technology.

STEM Girls Books - A company in development with three picture books coming out around Summer of 2017.

Women in Science the Card Game - An original, fun and educational card game that includes 44 different women for your children to learn about! Plus an expansion pack!

STEMBox - A monthly subscription box that sends science experiments to your door.

Beyond Curie Posters - A slew of posters of women scientists. Perfect for a classroom, or a bedroom!

Sasha Tech Savvy Loves to Code - A children’s book that hasn’t been released yet, but should come out soon!

Launch Ladies - Another children’s book (for very little ones) that will be released soon about Women in Space.

 

But Here’s the Bottom Line:

 

There should be NO PRESSURE for your child to have a career in STEM.  Everyone is different, everyone has different interests, and not everyone wants to be a scientist for a living.  That’s okay — of course it is.  There’s been a bigger push for women to come into science lately, but that’s because there’s a lot of opportunity there and everyone should know that this is an option for them if they want to go that route.

 

But if they don’t — that’s of course okay.

 

We’re going to continue to encourage girls to be interested in STEM, but there’s no pressure.

 

*this post was not sponsored

 
 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Mariah Loeber is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of FemSTEM.com. She studies English and is a huge fan of things STEM.  Find her on Twitter.

Teaching Girls That They’re Brilliant Starts With the Parents

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Originally Posted January 30th, 2017

A bit of a depressing study came out claiming that by age six girls didn’t think they were as brilliant as their boy counterparts.  This being said, it’s important to note that this was a small study, conducted in the US, with only 400 children — half of whom were girls.  That being said, it isn’t surprising that it was found to be true that people are negatively affected by stereotypes, and kids, who are especially impressionable, are as well.

 

Personally, I’d like to see a broader study take place, in more places around the US, and in other places around the world.  This is because cultures very drastically, even sub-cultures in the United States vary quite drastically.  That being said, it doesn’t take away from the fact that we don’t have to make this stereotype seem like it’s a reality.  We can teach our girls early on that they can and are brilliant.  But how?  Well, it starts with the parents.

 

EXPOSING YOUR CHILD TO STEM EDUCATION EARLY ON USING THE INTERNET

 

You don’t need to wait until pre-school to engage your child in learning.  This may seem obvious, but how can you do so?  There’s plenty of educational television these days, especially on channels such as PBS.  In fact, PBS has an entire program, website, and outreach program called SciGirls aimed to do just this — exposing girls to STEM and encouraging them to partake.

 

There’s also a few web shows to expose your child to, as well.  The internet is a great place to take advantage of, and offers a lot of free education.

 

Take SciShow Kids, hosted by Jessi Knudsen Castañeda, which will have been running on YouTube for 2 years on February 23rd.  Similarly, Castañeda also hosts Animal Wonders Montana, a YouTube channel dedicated to teaching others about animals and how to take care of them.  There’s also Crash Course Kids, hosted by Sabrina Cruz.

 

Of course, some of the subjects brought up on these channels may be aimed towards 5thgrade kids, but there’s no reason not to start exposing your children to them as soon as possible.  And if they have questions?  It gives you the perfect reason to engage with them on an educational level, and help explain to them something they might not understand right off the bat.

 

ENCOURAGING AND PRAISING YOUR GIRLS

 

A big step in letting girls know that they are brilliant is by telling them that.  Don’t hold back praise when your child figures something out, and encourage them to figure things out on their own when it’s applicable.  Help them out, too.  If your child fails, there’s nothing wrong with giving them a nudge in the right direction.  Failure is a great way to learn, but too much failure may bring about discouragement, and that won’t help the cause in the least bit.

 

And if your child fails?  Encouragement is different than praise in that it can be given without judging the failure or success of a child.  Encouragement focuses on the effort put forth, which means that even if your child may not deserve praise, they can receive kind words that will motivate them to try even harder next time.  Rather than taking the time to focus on the fact that your child failed at something, take the time to thank them or bring out the fact that they tried really hard, and that you’re proud of their efforts.

 

GET INVOLVED IN EVERY ASPECT OF YOUR GIRL’S EDUCATION

 

Parents — get down and get dirty.  Do STEM projects (or art projects or reading projects) with your children.  Don’t leave them to do these things alone.  The only way that your child can really prosper is if you get involved.  Let’s face it — children just don’t have the experience to go about everything on their own.  They need their parents to help guide them, and you can do so.  It takes time and effort, but isn’t it worth helping your girl gain a great self-esteem instead of waiting for them to become discouraged so early on in their schooling careers?

 
 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Mariah Loeber is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of FemSTEM.com. She studies English and is a huge fan of things STEM.  Find her on Twitter.